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Little Grrl Lost (Newford -20) by Charles de Lint

Little Grrl Lost (Newford #20) by Charles de Lint

Little (Grrl) Lost (2007) — The 20th book of the Newford series in Chronological order.

Category Edit

Young Adult

Description Edit

The story follows two main characters: Elizabeth and T.J. Even though they're very different, they're still friends. Even though T.J. is a human and Elizabeth is a little (a person about six inches tall), they're still friends. But when Elizabeth goes missing, it's up for her to get home and for T.J. to find her, resulting in a lot of discovery and growing up. ~ The Wordwood | Books / Little Grrl Lost

BOOK 20 BLURB—Little (Grrl) Lost (2007): When fourteen-year-old TJ and her family are forced to move from their farm to the suburbs, she has to give up her beloved horse, Red but she makes a surprising new friend. Elizabeth is a Little, a six-inch-high punked-out teen with an attitude, who has run away from home to make her way in the world. TJ and Elizabeth the Big and the Little soon become friends, but each quickly finds herself in a truly life-threatening situation, and they are unable to help each other. Little (Grrl) Lost is a delightful combination of realism, magic, humor, and hope, and is sure to win Charles de Lint many new teen and adult fans. ~ Goodreads | Little (Grrl) Lost (Newford, #20)

Excerpt Edit

Themes Edit

One way that TJ and Elizabeth learn about the Littles’ history and traditions is by consulting books—especially those of fictional author Sheri Piper, whose picture books hold the key to the mystery of the Littles and a possible temptation for Elizabeth. ~Little (Grrl) Lost Reviewed on Quill and Quire

World-BuildingEdit

Settings Edit

Supernatural / Mythical ElementsEdit

Littles, gnomes, fairies, goblins, elves, other magical beings, Faerie, Otherworld,

World Edit

A Little named Elizabeth Wood, her Big friend T.J. fresh from the farm, and the great big world of gnomes, fairies, goblins, and other magical beings they find when they take a step away from the safe, comfortable world the girls’ parents had created for them. A Little, it turns out, is a 6-inch tall person, and a whole family of them are living between the walls of the suburban house T.J.’s family moved into when their family farm failed. Full of punk energy and teenage angst, Elizabeth runs away from home far enough to meet T.J., in whose room the front door of their home is. Frightened by the discovery of their girl by the Big, Elizabeth’s parents quickly move, and in search of clues as to where they might have headed, T.J. and Elizabeth try to contact an author, Sheri Piper, whose books about little people seem real enough that the girls think she might just know about real Littles like Elizabeth. And then things start to go wrong. ~ Dustin M. Wax

Protagonists Edit

"Tetty ", Elizabeth Wood: six inch tall “Little” with home made grunge tee-shirts and bright blue hair

T.J.: T.J. who has had to move from the countryside and away from her beloved horse into the suburbs because her family’s finances have gone all sorts of downhill. T.J. is shy and awkward, a bit dull, a little too normal, and she clearly has no sense of fashion or adventure compared to the kids in the city. 

Characters Edit

Characters What About
T.J. 14-year-old her family moves to Newford suburbs, she's depressed, had to give up her horse; she and Eliz, a Little, go on a quest;
"Tetty ", Elizabeth Wood A Little eighteen-inch-tall girl whose family lives in the walls of the house T.J.'s family has bought;
Julie friend TJ's best friend who she left behind when she over to Newford
Sheri Piper children's book author T.J. & Elizabeth go to seek her help, she wrote about Littles and seems to know a lot about them; their plan is interrupted
Geoff bookstore clerk helps TJ
? Gnome talent for baking pies
Hedley
Ratcatcher

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~ Sources:

Cover ArtistsEdit

  • Scott Fischer — 2007-hc by Viking & 2009-pb by Firebird / Penguin

~ Source: Bibliography: Cover: Little (Grrl) Lost

Publishing InformationEdit

Publishers: Viking Juvenile, Firebird

  • Hardcover, First Ed., 271 pages, Pub: Sept 6th 2007 by Viking Juvenile—ISBN: 0670061441
  • Paperback, 288 pages, Pub: Jan 8th 2009 by Firebird—ISBN: 0142413011

TOC: Table of Contents Edit

  1. The Annoying Little
  2. The Blues Ain't Nothing But a Girl Six Inches Tall
  3. Don't Call Me Tetty
  4. Viga Vega
  5. If I Had Wings...
  6. Things That Explode in the Night
  7. And I Bid You Good Night

First Sentence Edit

SCRITCH, SCRITCH, SCRITCH.

QuotesEdit

Charles de Lint Quotes ~ GR

"Oh, crap, don't swat me." Those are the first words spoken by Elizabeth Wood, a six-inch-tall, sarcastic "Little," upon meeting 14-year-old T.J., a soft-spoken goody-two-shoes.  ~ eSebco Digital Books

~

She raised her fist to bang on the wall, then froze.
Because the impossible happened.
A small section of the baseboard opened as though it was a tiny door, spilling out a square of light. A girl appeared in the doorway, looking back inside. She held a duffel bag in one hand and was wearing a jean jacket over a T-shirt, a short red-and-black plaid skirt, and black clunky shoes. Her hair was neon blue. She looked to be about sixteen or seventeen.
And stood about six inches high. ~ bookshelves of doom

~

TriviaEdit

Lists That Contain Little (Grrl) Lost (Newford, #20) by Charles de Lint ~ GR

Notes / CommentsEdit

In order to better establish the difference between the narrations, De Lint writes T.J.’s section using the traditional third-person, past tense narration (“Jane walked to the store.”) incorporating periods from Geoff or Jaime’s perspective to flesh out certain events. Elizabeth’s sections, on the other hand, are written in the first-person, present tense (“I walk to the store.”), a style that is becoming very common in contemporary novels. (This style is also what makes Elizabeth’s sections of the narration sound more like De Lint’s other YA Newford novel, The Blue Girl.)

Most of the novel is set in the course of two very eventful days for the girls. Nonetheless, the narrative feels expansive. De Lint takes his time, fleshing out the details of T.J. and Elizabeth’s adventures. The story is also fairly light, maintaining a generally upbeat feel.

See AlsoEdit

External LinksEdit

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